Known & Documented Historical Evidence of Clan Leask

  • Family tradition has it that a Leask was on the second crusade 1101-1144, hence the reason for the crescent being adopted as a crest on the Coat-of-Arms. There are no known records extant.1
  • The Ragman Roll, de Ragements was compiled at the request of a legate of Scotland. He compelled all clergy to give a true account of their benefices, that they might be taxed at Rome accordingly. Subsequently, these lists were used by Edward I to create the four great roles of parchment recording the acts of fealty and homage done by the 2000 leading families of Scots to Edward I of England in 1296.2
  • One of the earliest references to Leask or a related spelling appeared in 1296 in a document recording the name of a William de Laskereske, which confirmed William’s recognition of Edward I (on pain of forfeiture of his lands). The name is actually listed as Lafkerefk, William de (del counte de fyf).3 Note: The 2000 names contained in the 1296 verson of the ragman role are listed alphabetically on the web site www.rampantscotland.com/ragman/blragman as they are listed in book published by the Bannatyne Club inEdinburghin 1834. The website explains that at that time “s” was written as “f,” that “counte meant county, and that “fyf” meant Fife.
  • David II, son of Robert the Bruce, granted a Charter of Confirmation for the lands of Leskgoroune (or Leskgaronne) to William Lesk, dated 1341-1346.4 Note: This William Leask is believed to be the first known Clan Chief of the Leasks in Slains Parish, Aberdeenshire.
  • The first wife of Willelmus de Lask of Laskgaronne, Aberdeenshire was Alicia de Rath, having no apparent issue. His second wife was Marcota (Marion) de St Michael. (Believed to be a descendant of Sir John de St. Michael) She had three children Thomas, Peter and William.5
  • Willelmi de Lask, the elder, lord of that ilk (believed to be the same William Lesk who was the first clan chief, or his son) “…bequeathed a pound of wax yearly to the altar of the Holy Rood in the church of St. Mary of Ellon, …and from his land of Logy, near Ellon, a stone of wax yearly, for lights to be burned on all Sabbath and feast days for ever on the tomb of himself and his wives Alice de Rath, and Mariot de St. Michael …and 12 silver pennies yearly from aforesaid land…for preparation of aforesaid wax…” The contract was witnessed by Alexander, Bishop of Aberdeen at Logy, 1380. The records continue “The ancient lords of Lask (or Leask), in Slains must have had some attachment towards the Church in Ellon. When the Session Records open, more than 200 years after this time “William of Lask (Laysk) of that ilk and his tenants ware found as regular attendants in Ellon at the Reformed Church.”6 Note: The deed is printed in Registrum Episcopatus Aberdonensis, volume 1, edited by Cosmo Innes, Published as Volume 13 of the Spalding Club, 1845. (Reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and in notes prepared by JWS Leask in 1924.
  • The Chapel of Leask located on the land of Leask, dates back to the earliest of times. The present ruins are believed to have been constructed in the 12th Century. It was dedicated to St. Adomnan and is exactly the same size, and stands in the same position, as the old chapel in Forvie, which is four miles away. Tradition says the chapel stands on the ruins of an ancient chapel, a Columbian Oratory, thought to have been built in the sixth or seventh Century. The font was octagonal in shape, and in good condition when it was removed to the manse garden, Slains.7
  • Toma de Lask domino eiusdem (Thomas Leask, lord of that Ilk) appears as a witness to a charter dated October 9, 1388, at Aberdeen, by Johannes de bona Villa dominus de Balhelvy (John Boneville, Lord of Balhelvy Boneville) to Johanni Fraser domino de Forglen (John Fraser, Lord of Forglen) of his two towns of Ardhendrachtis (now Ardendracht), in the parish of Cruden, and the earldom of Buchan, co Aberdeen.m Other witnesses include Thomas Hay-constable of Scotland, Alexander Fraser-Sheriff of Aberdeen, John Keith-Lord of Inverugie, and Andrew Turing-Lord of Foveran. n Thomas is believed to be the 2nd Clan Chief8 Note: The deed is printed in Collections for A History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, Spalding Club, 1843, at page 379 to 380. Reportedly that transcription comes from the original deed in the Charter Room at Slains. Reportedly it can also be found in the Registrar of the Privy Council of Scotland.
  • Toma de Lask domino eisudem (Thomas Leask of that ilk-2nd Chief) appears as a witness to a charter, dated at Forglen, co Aberdeen, January 8, 1388/89, by Johannes de Boneville (John Boneville), son and heir of the late John Boneville of Balhelvy Boneville, to John Fraser, lord of Forglen, of the lands of Balhelvy, Boneville, Colynstoun, Ardendrachtys, Blaretoun, Many and Achlochery, co Aberdeen.9
  • Thomas de Lask (2nd Chief) appears as Thomam de Lask in a precept of sasine, dated March 18, 1389/90 by William de Camera (Chalmers or Chambers), lord of Fyndon (now Findon), to Thomas Kynidy of the lands of Athquhorthy (now Auchorthies, Parish of Inverurie, co Aberdeen) in which he is designated baillie of Fyndon.10
  • Thomas de Lask or Laysk, second Clan Chief, was baillie of the barony of Fyndon, 1390.11
  • As Thomas de Lask dominus eiusdem (Thomas Leask, lord of that ilk) had a charter, dated May 10, 1390, from Henry Brogan (de Brogane), lord of Achlowne (now Auchloun, parish of Foveran, co Aberdeen r), to Thomas granting him half Henry Brogan’s lands of Achlowne Moness (now Minnies, parish of Foveran s), Balnakeddill (Balnakettle, parish of Udny, co Aberdeen t), and Touyhafe (Tillyeve) in the barony of King Edward, co Aberdeen. u Thomas Leask (2nd Chief) was granted a confirmation, dated at Aberdeen, co Aberdeen October 21, 1391, by James Lindsay, lord of Buchan, of the above mentioned charter to him of Auchloun by Henry Brogan. v12
  • In the Alexander Leask MS, at page 5, the source is given as being from the Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. Also found in the Charter Chest of the Earldom of Wigtown 1214 to 1681, published by the Scotish Record Society (as its volume 36), It is likely that the original deed is held by the Fleming family, for it is appears in précis as No 843, at page 100 to 101. (v) A Charter of Confirmation by James Lindsay, Lord of Buchan, of the above written Charter granted to Thomas of Lask; sealed and dated at Aberdeen, October 21, 1391. (Charter Chest of the Earldom of Wigtown, No 845, page 101.)The other half of the Brogan lands were granted by charter, dated May 10, 1390, by said Henry Brogan, to his father John Fothes (de Fothes) w, who was granted a charter of confirmation by James Lindsay, lord of Buchan, dated October 21, 1391.13
  • The other half of the Brogan lands were granted by charter, dated May 10, 1390, by said Henry Brogan, to his father John Fothes (de Fothes) w, who was granted a charter of confirmation by James Lindsay, lord of Buchan, dated October 21, 1391.x14
  • By a charter, dated August 20, 1392, Thomas Lask and John Fothes, son of Alan Fothes, granted the whole of the former Brogan lands to David Fleming, son of Malcolm Fleming, lord of Biggar, co Lanark.15
  • On August 28, 1392, as Thomas de Lask, he is a witness to the consent by Alicia Brogan, wife of Henry Brogan, of the instrument of renunciation of Christian Brogan, sister of Henry Brogan, and to the renunciation of Alicia’s own right of terce in the lands of Auchloun.16
  • In Kirkwall (Kirkwaw), Orkney on April 23, 1391 Thomas de Laysak (Lask), a knight (believed to be the second Leask clan chief), among others, witnessed a charter that transfers lands in Auchdale and Newberg to David Sinclair from Henry St. Clair, who became Earl of Orkney in 1379 when King Haakon VI granted the Orcadian Earldom to William Sinclair’s son Henry Sinclair (St. Clair).17 Note: In an email conversation Nevin Sinclair said he believes the reason so many people signed the 1391 document is that the gathering was to plan Prince Henry’s trip to America. Some claim Thomas joined Prince Henry on his voyage to the new world with about 300 of Prince Henry’s men in 12 ships. Nevin Sinclair claims he believes Thomas transferred from Aberdeen to Orkney to accompany Prince Henry to the new world. Sir Brian Chalmers Leask said he believes both Prince Henry and Sir Thomas de Lask were Knights Templar and they were both were on a crusade.
  • Humphrey Leask, the 3rd Clan Chief, oldest son of Thomas, who as Wmfra Lask was a member of an assize, held October 5, 1436, “of the gentillys of the cuntre in ane testificatione of the lard of Ardendracht bailye of the barony of Slanis that the lands of Brogan pertenit in property to the Earl of Erroll.18
  • Humphrey Leask (as Umfray Lask of yat ilk) is witness to a charter of confirmation dated November 13, 1440, by James III, King of Scotland, in favour of John Bannerman, burgess of Aberdeen, of the lands of Croffis, otherwise Cruives, previously held by the latter’s nephew, John Bannerman of Alesike.19
  • According to Brian Chalmers Leask Thomas de Lask’s second son-James de Cragy in Orkney, also known as Jamis of Leask, married Prince Henry’s daughter Margaret St. Clair in 1446. Jamis was also known as Lord Huip or Lord Hupe. ae He settled in Orkney.20
  • According to Clan Hay history, William de La Hay, the 5th High Constable became the first Earl of Erroll (1452).21
  • In 1456 Ulfrid or Wilfred Lask of that Ilk, signed a ‘Band of Manrent’ to William Earl of Erroll and resigned the lands of Leask and Auchlethin in favor of his son Thomas Lask. In this deed Thomas is designated ‘armiger’ to his superior, Sir William Hay.22
  • By a deed at the churchyard in Slains, November 4, 1456, Ulfredus Lask de eodem (Humphry Leask of that ilk) personally resigns his lands of Lask (Leask) and Achlethen (Auchlethen, parish of Cruden) in the barony of Slains into the hands of his superior, Sir William Hay, 1st Earl of Erroll, Constable of Scotland, for new infeftment in favor of his son and heir, Thomas Leask, the fourth Chief.23
  • By a deed dated at Slains, co Aberdeen, March 22, 1460/61, Umfra Laysk of that ilk, with the consent of his eldest son and heir, Thomas Leask, disposes (sells) the land called Brinthous, lying in the town (toun) of Tawarty (now Tarty), co Aberdeen, to said Sir William Hay, 1st Earl of Erroll.24
  • Thoma Lesk de eodem (Thomas Leask of that ilk), is witness, with his second son Johanne Lesk filio dicti Thome (John Leask), and others, to the precept of sasine, dated July 14, 1483, granted by Thomas Erskine, lord of the barony of Kellie, in favor of Alexander Menzies, burgess of Aberdeen, and of his wife Elizabeth Leslie, of the lands of Laskguyeon, in said barony of Kellie, co Aberdeen, on the resignation of John Menzies.25
  • Willielmo Laisk de eodem (William of that Ilk) is designated baillie (ballivo meo) of Gilbert Hay of Carmuk (Son of Sir Gilbert Hay of Dronlaw ak), in a precept of sasine in favor of Walter Hay, son of Gilbert Hay of Caramuk, of his lands of Caramuk and Ardgeicht, in the parish of Ellon, co of Aberdeen, dated at Ellon August 4, 1484. al William is the fifth Clan Chief. ((Sources: (ak) Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at pages 147 to 148. Source reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001) (al) The source is reported to be the Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. The precept is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at pages 27 to 28 where it states it has been abridged from the original which is held in the charter room at Ellon. Sources reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 7, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001))
  • Wilyame off Laysk (William of Leask) is a witness to a letter of manrent granted by Alexander Fraser of Fillorht (Philorth, parish of Fraserburgh, co Aberdeen) to William Hay, Earl of Erroll, dated at the Chanonry of Ross, January 14, 1488/89.26
  • Willelmo Lesk de eodem (William Leask) was witness to the precept of sasine, dated October 9, 1498, granted by William Hay, Earl of Erroll, in favor of his son, John Hay, of half the lands of Brogane Lesk, in the barony of Slains, co Aberdeen, on the resignation of Agnes Brogan and her son, Thomas Alexander.27
  • As Willelmo Laysk de eodem, he is witness to a contract dated February 22, 1498/99, between Johannem Chaumer de Auchcorvy (John Chaumer of Auchcorvy) and Dauid Knox de Auchcorvy (David Knox of Auchcorvy) regarding a marriage between their children.28
  • “Witnessing me, Jhon Cheyne of Esselmont, till be bundyn and oblist, and to be be becumyn men and servand to my lord Erroll for all the days of my lyf, myne allegeans accebtit allenarly to our Soverane Lord and Kyng. Dated at the Chappel of Lasque, 9 September, 1499. Befor thir witnesses, Wilyam Hay of Ardendracht, Mastir Alexander Cabell, Parson of Banchory, and Gylbert Hay.”29
  • “By 1500 the Earls of Erroll residing in Old Slains Castle, were now a mighty power in the district, and from most of the barons around they held ‘Bands of Manrent,’ so common in Scottish history, and which came to be a source of great trouble to the crown.”30
  • A Thomas of Laysk (perhaps another son of William the 5th Chief) had an action in the Court of Session in Newburg, parish of Foveran co Aberdeen, on April 16, 1504 against Alexander Bannerman in Knaven for relief of rent of the third part of the lands of Knaven. Said Thomas Leask undertook to warrend kape and defend Alexander Bannerman in Knaven skaithless and free of maile of the third part of Knavene taken up by him frae the said Alexander insofar as law wile.31
  • As Willelmo Leisk de eodem, William Leask, 5th of Leask, appears in an instrument of sasine, dated in August 1504, granted by William Hay, Earl of Erroll, Constable of Scotland, with consent of his son, Sir William Hay of Capeth, in favour of another son, John Hay, of the lands of Craigiecroft with its mill, and the multures from said earl’s lands of Leysk, Mekil, Artrawchy, and Auchlethen in the barony of Slains, co Aberdeen. Alexander Leask, oldest son of William, appears in the document as Alexander Leisk de eodem, baillie (balivus) of William Hay, Earl of Erroll.32
  • William Laysk, (second son of Wlliam Leask the fifth Clan Chief) is admitted a burgess of Aberdeen, co of Aberdeen, in 1505/06.33
  • Richard Leask, (the grandson of Jamis, son of Thomas) was the progenitor of the Leasks of Shetland.34
  • Richard Leask, grandson of Jamis of Lask, son of William Leask is appointed Exor (executor) to Sir David Sinclair in 1506.35
  • Andrew Gray brought an action against Thomas Leisk in Newburgh on November 29, 1507 for having a violent occupation.36
  • As Willelmum Laysk de eodem, William Leask is a member of an inquest, held at the court of Alexander Bannerman of Waterton, sheriff-depute of Aberdeen, at Aberdeen on February 17, 1509/10, to inquire into the lands pertaining to William Johnston on the death of his father, Alexander Johnstone of Johnstone.37
  • On September 9, 1513 the Leask Clan Chief (William Lask and his son (Alexander Lask) were killed at Flodden Field with their feudal superior William Hay, Earl of Errol and King James IV. ay The Earl of Errol fought on King James IV left with the Earls of Crawford and Montrose, between the borders division led by the Earls of Huntly and Home on the extreme left and King James IV who fought in the center.38
  • Alexander Lask’s younger brother, William Lask, Burgess of Aberdeen, became the 6th Leask Clan Chief as a result of the death of William Lask and his son, Alexander at Flodden.39
  • William Leask, 7th of Leask, on February 26, 1514/1515, as Willame Lesk, Burgess of Abirdene, grants a letter of manrent in favour of William Hay, Earl of Errol.40
  • A precept of sasine dated April 18, 1521 is granted by William Hay, Earl of Errol, in favor of his son, William Hay, brother and nearest heir of the late John Hay of ‘Neddir Leisk cum molendino’ (Neither Leask with its mill), in the barony of Slains, co Aberdeen.41
  • William Leask appears in a cognition, dated 1551 regarding the marches between the lands of Nether Ardlethin, belonging to Alexander Chalmers of Balnacraig, Arthur Forbes, and Alexander Hay, portioners thereof, and the Ald mil of Essilmonth, belonging to Thomas Cheyne, fiar of Esselmont, parish of Ellon, co Aberdeen.42
  • In 1574 William Lesk of that Ilk signed an oath of allegiance to King James VI on September 2, 1574, as one of the “Barons of the North and others.”43
  • In 1594 the Earl of Errol joined in the Earl of Huntley’s rebellion against the King, King James VI resulting in the destruction of Slains Castle. He latter was pardoned.44
  • In 1595, at Linlithgow Palace for good service of the said Wil L. [sic] younger, the said lands he (the king) gave to him again after the outcasting of the said Franc.” (Earl of Errol) preserving the Leask lands.45
  • In 1596 Walter Leisk of that ilk, with a legitimate son James, is named in the ecclesiastical records as having studied at Marischal College in Aberdeen.46
  • In Orkney, the Uthel Book of 1601records parcels of land on the Island of Papa Westray, Orkney. There were 16 parcels in all, not owned by the Church or the Earl of Orkney. Most of these 16 parcels were owned by the Leask’s and Howieson’s. It is assumed by Sir Brian Chalmers Leask of Aglath that the Lask Family that owned these parcels were members of the de Lask family of Aberdeenshire. However the Uthel Book was written much later than Brian Chalmers Leask Assumed.47
  • The Leask’s lost their remaining lands in Aberdeen as a result of investing borrowed money in the ill-fated Darien Scheme in June 1698 that was secured by their land.48

  1. Source: Sir Brian Chalmers Leask of Aglath Leask’s Genealogical Guide to Some Australian Families and their Antecedents and Genealogies, compiled an edited by Brian Chalmers Leask, Kt. T., 1979, page 333. 

  2. Source: www.bartleby.com/81/14017.html and www.rampartscotland.com/ragman/blragman_index.html 

  3. Source: www.clan-leask.co.uk/leaskhis.html#origins and www.rampartscotland.com/ragman/blragman_index.html. However, the booklet: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask published in 1980 states on page 2,3 that the name Leask is missing from the ragman role. 

  4. Source: Carta confirmationis to William Lesk of the lands of Leskgoroune. RMS v1, Appendix 2, No 1086, page 585, as reported by John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth on July 7, 2001 in The Leasks of that ilk and their Cadets, an unpublished paper, and The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, published in 1980, page 2. Editors Note: I could not find the charter of confirmation in this volume. I did find it listed on page 585, #1087 as part of the Index & Remains of the Lost Charter Rolls in Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum (AD 1306-1424)  

  5. Source: Leask’s Genealogical Guide to Some Australian Families and their Antecedents and Genealogies compiled and Edited by Brian Chalmers Leask, Kt. T., 1979, page 333. 

  6. Sources: The Leasks by madam Leask of Leask published in 1980, page 2,3.; and the Clan Leask Society Website  

  7. Source: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 15 

  8. Sources: Found in the Place-Names of Aberdeenshire, page 156 and The place names of West Aberdeenshire by James Macdonald, page 33. Source also reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and Alexander Leask MS, page 4. 

  9. Source: The charter of confirmation in favour of said John Fraser dated at Linlithgow, co Linlithgow, June 4, 1400 is printed in Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff at page 289 to 290. Also reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and Alexander Leask MS, page 4. 

  10. Source: The deed is printed in Collections for A History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff at page 272 to 273. The original is reported to be in the archives of Marischal College, Aberdeen. Also reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and in Alexander Leask MS, page 5. 

  11. Source: Surnames of Scotland, George F. Black, which cites, CAB page 272. 

  12. Sources: (r) The Place-Names of Aberdeenshire, by William M. Alexander, 1952; at page 10. (s) The Blackhalls of that ilk and Barra, by Alexander Morison, 1905 at page 14. (t) The Place-Names of Aberdeenshire, by William M. Alexander, 1952; at page 16. (u)  

  13. Sources are reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and in Alexander Leask MS, page 5.)  

  14. Sources: (w) Alexander Leask MS, page 5 cites the source as being from the Register of the Privy Council. The original deed is likely held by the Fleming family, and a précis is printed in the Charter Chest of the Earldom of Wigtown as No 844 at page 101. (x) Charter Chest of the Earldom of Wigtown, No 846, page 101. Sources reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001. 

  15. Source: Alexander Leask MS, page 5 cites the source as being from the Register of the Privy Council, which in turn is sourced from the original deed in the Cumbernauld Chest dated August 20, 1392. 

  16. Source: Charter Chest of the Earldom of Wigtown, No 849, page 101 as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001. 

  17. Source: The document can be found on the website http://clansinclairus.org/clan_yo_ricardo.htm. The charter of the confirmation by Robert III, King of Scotland, confirming this grant is printed in RMS v1, No 824, page 320, as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 and Alexander  Leask MS, page 5. 

  18. Source: Collections for a history of the shires of Aberdeen and Banff, page 393-394 

  19. Sources: Alexander Leask MS, page 9, where the source is cited as Cartularium Ecclesiae S Nicholai Aberdonesnsis, volume 1, page 10 and 11 and volume 2, page 28 as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  20. Source: Clan Leask website, http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/htol/leask2.html and information provided by Brian Chalmers Leask of Australia 

  21. Source: www.clanhay.net/HISTORY/hays.johnMackay.html 

  22. Source: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 4 

  23. Source: The deed is printed in Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff at Page 395. The original deed is in the Charter room at Slains as reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 7, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001. 

  24. Source: This deed is printed in the Register of the Privy Council; and in Council of Scotland; and in Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, at page 364. There is a copy in the Charter room at Slains. 

  25. Source: Reported to be the Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland. The charter itself, dated July 4, 1483, is printed, without the precept of sasine, in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at pages 147 to 148 as reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 8, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  26. Sources: Alexander Leask MS, page 8, cites the source as the Spalding Club publications as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001). 

  27. Sources: Alexander Leask MS, page 9 cites the source as the Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. The precept is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at page 149 where a footnote gives the details of the precept of sasine. Sources as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  28. Source: The contract is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 4, pages 65 to 66, where it states it has been abridged form the notary’s protocol in the Register of Sasines for the burgh of Aberdeen, volume 1 as reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 7, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  29. Sources: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 15 

  30. Sources: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 4 

  31. Sources: Alexander Leask MS, page 9, reports the source to be the Session Court Record as reported to be The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001). 

  32. Source: Alexander Leask MS, page 9 reports the source to be the Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. The precept is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at page 150, where it states it has been abridged from a copy in the charter room at Slains. 

  33. Source: Alexander Leask MS, page 9, reports the source to be New Spalding Club Miscellany, volume 1, page 43, as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001). 

  34. Source: Clan Leask Website, www.electricscotland.com/webclans/htol/leask2.html 

  35. Source: Leask’s Genealogical Guide to Some Australian Families and their Antecedents and Genealogies, compiled and edited by Brian Chalmers Leask, Kt. T., 1979, page 333. 

  36. Source: Alexander Leask MS, page 10. The source is reportd to be the Session Court Record as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001. 

  37. Source: Reportedly the inquest is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at pages 420 to 422, where it states the original is held in Libri Curiae Viceomitatus de Aberdeen, Volume 1 as reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 10, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  38. Sources: (ay) www.electricscotland.com/webclans/htol/leask2.html and the Clan Leask Website (az) Scotland, The Story of a Nation, by Magnus Magnusson, Atlantic Monthly Press, 2000, pages 287 to 294. 

  39. Source: www.electricscotland.com/webclans/htol/leask2.html and Clan Leask Website 

  40. Source It is reported that an abridged form of the document appears in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at page 147, in a footnote. The source given as Miscellany of the Spalding Club, volume 2, page 155 as reported in Alexander Leask, page 10, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  41. Source: Alexander Leask reports the source to be the Register of the Privy Council of Scotland. The deed is printed in Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at page 155, where it states it has been abridged from a copy in the charter room at Slains as reported in The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  42. Sources: The source is reported to be the Illustrations of the Topography and Antiquities of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff, volume 3, at pages 20 to 21 where it states it has been abridged from the original which is held in the charter room at Slains as reported in Alexander Leask MS, page 10, and The Leasks of that Ilk and their Cadets: John Lawrence Cairns-Smith-Barth dated 7 July 2001 

  43. Source:The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 5 

  44. Source:The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 5 

  45. Source:The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 5 

  46. Source:The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 5 

  47. Source: Leask’s Genealogical Guide to Some Australian Families and their Antecedents and Genealogies, compiled and edited by Brian Chalmers Leask, Kt. T., 1979, page 332. 

  48. Source: The Leasks by Madam Leask of Leask, page 5 

3 Responses to Known & Documented Historical Evidence of Clan Leask

  1. I understand your points. Jay Leask agrees the presentation is confusing and he is thinking about how to better present what we know in a less confusing way

    As for what is posted I have tried to identify what is documented and where it is documented; and to present speculation as such and to identify its source. My hope is that by posting speculation and identifying its source others with better facts to present will be motivated to provide what they know so we can advance our knowledge and narrow speculation.

    My experience is that much of ancient history starts as speculation (hypothesis) sometimes mixed with facts and as research is done and facts are developed some speculation is dismissed and other speculation leads to the discovery of new facts.

    I hope Leasks and historians will both come forward with more information that we can add to what is posted here so we can enhance the knowledge of our ancestors and so Leasks across the world can be proud of our heritage.

  2. Some of the detail is fascinating if somewhat difficult to follow. I wonder , though, should so much unfounded speculation and assumption by B.C. Leask and Madame Leask in their respective publications be adopted as a plausible record of some un-associated and un-related peoples with the same name (Leask). Having put a lot of thought and work into my family’s history and research into the possible source of the name, I have learned not to assume anything and only to record matters that are irrefutable. If Madame Leask and Brian Chalmers Leask had adopted the same principles, much content would be removed from their respective volumes. That is not to say that recording and disseminating medieval records is not laudible. I suggest that too much sometimes is being read into them in an effort to glamourise our pre-decessors and bask in the reflected glory. Sorry for being such a sceptic, but in matters like this,”Feet should be kept on the ground”. Regards Richard Leask —please reply—

  3. Fantastic history overview, goes farther back by centuries from what my late Dad Malcolm Christie Leask [1915 – 1999] first cousin of Madam Anne Leask of Leask, knew about in his lifetime, even with nearly 40 years od research to discover his family history.now I also have a rwason for the Crescent Moon in the Family Crest.
    Thanks for compiling this! My gratitude is genuinely high!