After the Union with England (1603 AD forward)

•     1608 AD        Earl Patrick’s outrageous behavior and many his alleged crimes as Earl of Orkney led made Bishop Law in 1608 to write the following to King James VI ‘Alas, dear and dreaded Sovereign, truly it is to be pitied that so many of your Majesty’s subjects are so manifoldly and grievously oppressed; some by ejection and banishment from their homes and native soil, others by contorting the laws and extorting their goods, the most part being so impoverished that some of them neither dare nor may complain, but in silent and forced patience groan under their grievance.’ (11-page 29-30)

•     1609 AD        Earl Patrick is arrested and accused of many things including forced labor, but in the end he was indited on seven counts of treason. (11-page 30)

•     1615 AD        Earl Patrick Stewart of Orkney was beheaded and his son Patrick was hanged within a few weeks of each other in 1615, in Edinburg. (10-page 155) (11-page 30) The Stewart Earls were followed by years of absentee tacksmen. As a result of continued abuse and famine the people of Orkney continued to suffer (11-page 31)

•     March 27, 1625 AD        James VI of Scotland and James I of England dies of a massive stroke. (4-page 415)

•     1631-33 AD        During the famine years of 1631 and 1633 some 3000 to 4000 people are believed to have perished (11-page 31)

•     May 13, 1639 AD        (A) The Trot of Turriff: Royalist troops representing King Charles, led by Gordon, Marquis of Huntly routed the Covenanters who were garrisoned at Turriff. (1-page 146-149)

•     June 15, 1639 AD        At Megray Hill, Montrose and the Earl Marischal who led the Covenanters routed James Gordon, Viscount Aboyne who led the Royalists. (1-page 149-153)

•     June 18, 1639 AD        (A) Brig of Dee: Royalists led by James Gordon, Viscount Aboyne, successively defended Aberdeen against an army of covenanters led by James Graham, Earl of Montrose. (1-page 150-54)

•     August 28, 1640 AD        Newburn: An English army led by the Earl of Northumberland defeated a Scottish army Led by Sir Alexander Leslie of Balgonie and Montrose. (2-page 113-116)

•     1643 AD        Orkney’s long association with the Earls of Morton begin as when William Douglas was granted the earldom lands by Charles I in exchange for loans of large sums of money.

•     September 13, 1644 AD        Justice Mills: James Graham, Earl of Montrose, now leading Royalist troops, successfully captured Aberdeen city from covenanters. (1-page 155-165 )

•     October 28, 1644 AD        Fyvie: Graham, Earl of Montrose, leading Royalist troops, engaged covenanter troops led by Archibald Campbell, marquis of Argyll. The result was a stalemate. (1-page 167-172)

•     July 2, 1645 AD        (A) Alford: The Royalists, under the Earl of Montrose, decisively defeated the covenanters. (1-page 173-182)

•     August 15, 1645 AD        Kilsyth: Montrose, leading the Royalists defeats General Baillie, the Scottish Parliament Commander and his covenanter army. (2-page 117-119)

•     September 13, 1645 AD        Philiphaugh (South of Selkirk): Major General Sir David Leslie leading a covenanter army defeated Montrose’s army of Royalists. (2-page 121-123)

•     September 3, 1650 AD        Dunbar: Cromwell and the English defeated General Leslie and the Scots. (2-page 125-128)

•     July 27, 1689 AD        Killiecrankie: Colonel John Graham, Viscount of Dundee, was defeated by General Hugh MacKay and Lord Murray in support of King William III ending hope of a Jacobie revival. (2-page 129-135)

•     February 12, 1692 AD        Glencoe: The Macdonalds of Glencoe are massacred. (2-page 137-139)

•     June 1698 AD        The Leasks lost their remaining lands in Aberdeen as a result of investing borrowed money in the ill-fated Darien Scheme in June 1698 that was secured by their land. (bi)

•     September 20, 1745 AD      Prestonpans: Scots supporting Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobite cause defeated a small English army. (2-page 141-147)

•     December 23, 1745 AD       (A) Inveruie: A Jacobite force, led by Lord Lewis Gordon, defeated a government force led by Lord Louden and Duncan Forbes of Culloden. (1-page 183-193)

•     April 18, 1746 AD        Culloden: The Jacobite cause is defeated with his Highland supporters . (2-page 149-156)

•     1750 AD        Aberdeen: Start of the dispersal of Farm Tourns into single farmsteads and new planned villages.